News Headlines
From news.glin.net:

Phoenix prepared for pricey fix to water problem
Time Warner Cable News (10/22)
After years of complaints about murky water, officials in Phoenix, N.Y., unanimously voted to contract out to another water source for drinking water. The village may end up getting its water from Lake Ontario.

Zoning appeal filed over Erie bayfront walkway
Erie Times-News (10/22)
A waterfront access advocate has filed a formal appeal with the Erie, Pa., zoning office, contending that 1,100 feet of new public walkway along the former GAF Materials Corp. property on Lake Erie does not comply with city zoning laws.

Stormwater forum brings out North Shore, Ill. residents
Sun-Times (10/22)
Interested Illinois residents, many of whom have dealt with stormwater issues personally, packed an auditorium to hear from several local stormwater experts on ways to manage storm water and protect Lake Michigan.

After years of build up, dredging at Wilson Harbor in Wilson, N.Y. underway
Time Warner Cable News (10/22)
Almost a decade had come and gone without any dredging at the harbor, leaving silt to build up and lowering the water level. After several years of red tape and road blocks, dredging in Wilson Harbor continues. Work started in September and should be finished by mid-November.

St. Lawrence County lawmakers support plan to regulate St. Lawrence River water flow, levels
North Country Now (10/21)
The operations committee in St. Lawrence County, N.Y., is supporting a proposed water plan that would regulate flows and levels on the St. Lawrence River.

Seventh Freshwater Summit on tap
Traverse City Record-Eagle (10/15)
Jon Allan, the director for Michigan's Office of the Great Lakes, is expected to deliver a keynote address on water strategy at the upcoming Freshwater Summit in Traverse City, Mich.

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Great Lakes Commission

Water Use Sector Definitions

1. Public Water Supply: Water distributed to the public through a physically connected system of treatment, storage and distribution facilities serving a group of largely residential customers that may also serve industrial, commercial, and other institutional operators. Water Withdrawn directly from the Basin and not through such a system shall not be considered to be used for Public Water Supply Purposes.
2. Self-Supply Commercial and Institutional: Commercial uses include Water used by motels, hotels, restaurants, office buildings and institutions, both civilian and military, that would not otherwise be considered Public Water Supplies. This category also includes Water for mobile homes, hospitals, schools, air conditioning and other similar uses not covered under a public supply. In addition, this category includes amusement and recreational Water uses such as snowmaking and Water slides.
3. Self-Supply Irrigation: Water artificially applied on lands to assist in the growing of crops and pastures or in the maintenance of recreational lands, such as parks and golf courses.

4. Self-Supply Livestock: Water used by horses, cattle, sheep, goats, hogs, poultry, and other commercially important animals. Water used in fish hatchery operations are also included under this category.

5. Self-Supply Industrial: Industrial Water includes Water used in the manufacture of metals, chemicals, paper, food and beverage and other Products. Mining Water use includes Water used in the extraction or washing of minerals, for example solids, such as coal and ores, and liquids such as crude petroleum and natural gas. Water used in quarrying and milling is also included in the industrial category. Brine extraction from oil and gas operations is not included. Withdrawals and Consumptive Uses for industrial and mining purposes (including dewatering operations) recorded under another category (e.g., public supply) will not be recorded here. Once initially reported, Water used in a closed cycle (recirculation) will not be reported as a Withdrawal. "Make-up Water" will be reported once upon entering the system. Other situations should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.

6. Self-Supply Thermoelectric Power (Once-through cooling): Withdrawals and consumptive uses already recorded under another category (e.g., public supply) will not be reported here. Typically, these facilities are fueled by fossil fuels such as coal, oil or natural gas.

7. Self-Supply Thermoelectric Power (Recirculated cooling): Withdrawals and consumptive uses already recorded under another category (e.g., public supply) will not be reported here. Once initially reported, Water used in a closed cycle (recirculation) will not be reported as a Withdrawal. "Make-up Water" will be reported once upon entering the system. Typically these facilities are powered by nuclear fuel.

8. Off-Stream Hydroelectric Power Production: Water removed from a stream channel and used to drive turbines that generate electric power. This category also includes "off-stream use" for pumped-storage systems [e.g., reservoir storage] that return water to the source.

9. In-Stream Hydroelectric Water Use: This category includes "run of the river" use which is not considered a Water Withdrawal or Consumptive Use. Reporting for this category is voluntary.

10. Self-Supply - Other: Water used for purposes not reported in categories one through nine. Examples include, but are not limited to, withdrawals for fish/wildlife, environmental, recreation, navigation, and water quality purposes. Specifically, water used to maintain levels for navigation, for recreation, for fish and wildlife habitat creation and enhancement (excluding fish hatchery operations included under Category 5), for flow augmentation (or diversion), for sanitation, pollution confinement, and other water quality purposes and agricultural activities (services) other than those directly related to irrigation.