News Headlines
From news.glin.net:

Geysers on the Maumee
The Toledo Blade (8/18)
A geyser is not something you expect to see while traveling along or over the Maumee River, but in 1952 you might have seen one.

Lake Erie: Is it time to worry again about its health?
Erie Time-News (8/12)
Lake Erie is the shallowest and warmest of the Great Lakes, making biological conditions more conducive for algae growth, and making the lake more susceptible to effects of climate change. And invasive species are a persistent threat.

Surfing on the Great Lakes has its own culture
Second Wave (8/12)
Surfing on the Great Lakes draws more adventurous surfers in recent years to northern Michigan. While it may not be a surf mecca along the lines of Oahu, it has a style all its own, say its devotees.

COMMENTARY: Time for Ontario to be more ambitious on water
Northumberland View (8/11)
With its new majority, Ontario should pass an ambitious Great Lakes Protection Act and create new financing tools for water management.

Spirits rise as Great Lakes, inland water levels rebound
Battle Creek Enquirer (8/10)
The story of improving Great Lakes water levels can be discerned in the things unheard this summer like complaints.

Could toxic lake algae affect Wisconsin's water?
Green Bay Press Gazette (8/10)
Can toxic algae result in drinking water advisories in Wisconsin? Probably not. But that doesn't mean Wisconsin's waters are free of toxic algae blooms.

Questions?

Comments or questions about this website or project? Contact Becky Pearson, bpearson@glc.org

Great Lakes Commission

Water Use Sector Definitions

1. Public Water Supply: Water distributed to the public through a physically connected system of treatment, storage and distribution facilities serving a group of largely residential customers that may also serve industrial, commercial, and other institutional operators. Water Withdrawn directly from the Basin and not through such a system shall not be considered to be used for Public Water Supply Purposes.
2. Self-Supply Commercial and Institutional: Commercial uses include Water used by motels, hotels, restaurants, office buildings and institutions, both civilian and military, that would not otherwise be considered Public Water Supplies. This category also includes Water for mobile homes, hospitals, schools, air conditioning and other similar uses not covered under a public supply. In addition, this category includes amusement and recreational Water uses such as snowmaking and Water slides.
3. Self-Supply Irrigation: Water artificially applied on lands to assist in the growing of crops and pastures or in the maintenance of recreational lands, such as parks and golf courses.

4. Self-Supply Livestock: Water used by horses, cattle, sheep, goats, hogs, poultry, and other commercially important animals. Water used in fish hatchery operations are also included under this category.

5. Self-Supply Industrial: Industrial Water includes Water used in the manufacture of metals, chemicals, paper, food and beverage and other Products. Mining Water use includes Water used in the extraction or washing of minerals, for example solids, such as coal and ores, and liquids such as crude petroleum and natural gas. Water used in quarrying and milling is also included in the industrial category. Brine extraction from oil and gas operations is not included. Withdrawals and Consumptive Uses for industrial and mining purposes (including dewatering operations) recorded under another category (e.g., public supply) will not be recorded here. Once initially reported, Water used in a closed cycle (recirculation) will not be reported as a Withdrawal. "Make-up Water" will be reported once upon entering the system. Other situations should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.

6. Self-Supply Thermoelectric Power (Once-through cooling): Withdrawals and consumptive uses already recorded under another category (e.g., public supply) will not be reported here. Typically, these facilities are fueled by fossil fuels such as coal, oil or natural gas.

7. Self-Supply Thermoelectric Power (Recirculated cooling): Withdrawals and consumptive uses already recorded under another category (e.g., public supply) will not be reported here. Once initially reported, Water used in a closed cycle (recirculation) will not be reported as a Withdrawal. "Make-up Water" will be reported once upon entering the system. Typically these facilities are powered by nuclear fuel.

8. Off-Stream Hydroelectric Power Production: Water removed from a stream channel and used to drive turbines that generate electric power. This category also includes "off-stream use" for pumped-storage systems [e.g., reservoir storage] that return water to the source.

9. In-Stream Hydroelectric Water Use: This category includes "run of the river" use which is not considered a Water Withdrawal or Consumptive Use. Reporting for this category is voluntary.

10. Self-Supply - Other: Water used for purposes not reported in categories one through nine. Examples include, but are not limited to, withdrawals for fish/wildlife, environmental, recreation, navigation, and water quality purposes. Specifically, water used to maintain levels for navigation, for recreation, for fish and wildlife habitat creation and enhancement (excluding fish hatchery operations included under Category 5), for flow augmentation (or diversion), for sanitation, pollution confinement, and other water quality purposes and agricultural activities (services) other than those directly related to irrigation.