News Headlines
From news.glin.net:

COMMENTARY: Good to go
Watertown Daily Times (7/31)
The International Joint Commissionís Plan 2014 is a practical measure to make Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River healthier and prepare for climate change. The idea is to regulate the extreme high and low water levels and follow their natural, seasonal flows.

Lake Michigan water level up 2 feet since January 2013
South Bend Tribune (7/25)
Higher water levels delight marine enthusiasts, particularly the owners of large boats with difficulties running aground the past few seasons. The lake is still below its normal level but nowhere near the record low set in January 2013.

New St. Lawrence swimming hole proposed
Global News (7/24)
A harbor pool to facilitate swimming in the St. Lawrence river near Montreal has been proposed, but some worry about water pollution.

Lake Ontario bay dredging project set to start
The Wall Street Journal (7/21)
A dredging project aimed at clearing built-up silt from a Lake Ontario bay gets underway near Rochester, N.Y.

Ohio pushes to end sediment dumping into Lake Erie
Associated Press (7/20)
Ohio environmental regulators are working with local and federal agencies to find new uses for dredged sediment so that it no longer ends up in Lake Erie.

Michigan residents consider how to limit erosion at popular Lake Superior destination
The Associated Press (7/14)
Marquette, Mich. officials are looking for ways to limit erosion around Presque Isle Park, a popular recreational area in Michigan's Upper Peninsula. Park committee members are concerned about decreasing vegetation and soil cover around the popular Lake Superior destination.

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Great Lakes Commission

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About this website              

Welcome to the Great Lakes Regional Water Use Database, providing comparable water use information on withdrawals, diversions and consumptive uses. This database supports the states and provinces in implementing Article 4 of the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact  and Article 301 of the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin Sustainable Water Resources Agreement.  Under the Compact and the Agreement, the parties (states and provinces) are required to report water use information to the regional database repository and aggregated information will be made available to the public on an annual basis. In 2012, the database was redesigned to comply with the Interim State/Provincial Reporting Protocols to the Regional Water Use Database, adopted by the Regional Body and Compact Council on December 8, 2009.

The Great Lakes Regional Water Use Database has been around for over 20 years! Originally, it was established by the Great Lakes states and provinces in response to the recommendation of the Great Lakes Charter of 1985, which calls for a uniform, consistent base of data of Great Lakes water withdrawals, diversions and consumptive uses. Beginning in 1987, water use data have been submitted to the repository on an annual basis and reports provided to assist the jurisdictions in Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River water resources planning and management.  As specified by the Water Resources Management Committee in its 1987 report, Managing the Waters of the Great Lakes Basin, the database catalogs withdrawals by water use category, sub-basin and jurisdiction.