homecontact
Great Lakes Tributary Modeling Program
modelsabout sedimentation partners publications resources events

models


About the Models
Model Types
Model Development
Data Requirements

Completed Models »

Models in Progress »



meetings


New Report:

  • new Review of In-stream Nonpoint Source Control Methodologies to Reduce Erosion and Sedimentation and Abate Phosphorus Loadings to the Great Lakes

  • Upcoming Events:

    Visit the program's events page to see the latest listing of events.

    New Tools:

  • Educational Primers on Nonpoint Source Pollution


  • Visit our Resources page for additional nonpoint source and sediment related materials.

     


    Resources

    By supporting state and local watershed planning measures that will reduce the loading of sediments and pollutants to tributaries, the work of the Great Lakes Tributary Modeling Program is helping to reduce the need for and costs of navigation dredging while promoting actions to delist Great Lakes Areas of Concern (AOCs).

    The following resources are intended to educate resource professionals on the basics of nonpoint source (NPS) pollution and to expand the knowledge of and provide additional educational tools for more seasoned professionals.

    As we continue to develop these resources, we ask you to consider what resources you might find useful and how these materials can be improved.

    Please send us your feedback!

     

    Communication and Outreach:

    Webinar: Informational Seminar on the Great Lakes Tributary Modeling Program

    This webcast is designed to introduce new audiences and partner agencies to the Great Lakes Tributary Modeling Program, present a brief demonstration of several web-based erosion and sediment models, and discuss opportunities for ongoing partnership. Presentations are geared toward the specific audience and geographic location targeted for each session.

    Webinar: January 28, 2009 - for Conservation District staff in MN, MI, and WI (Lake Superior Basin)

    (Agenda | Presentations | Presenters)

    Webinar: April 26, 2010 - for USGS and ARS partners

    (Agenda | Presentations | Presenters)

    Webinar: April 27, 2011 - for NRCS partners in MI

    (Agenda | Presentations | Presenters)

    Webinar: February 23, 2012 - for NRCS partners in IN, WI, MN

    (Agenda | Presentations | Presenters)

    Webinar: November 30, 2012 - for NRCS partners in OH, PA, NY

    (Agenda | Presentations | Presenters)

    Webinar: Sediment Reduction: Correlating BMP Installation with Ecological Improvement in the Great Lakes

    The Great Lakes Restoration Initiative funding requires recipients to track progress. In the nonpoint section two pollutants are being tracked: Sediment and Phosphorus. Monitoring each BMP installation is too expensive and requires long time periods to be scientifically accurate. The alternative is to calculate surrogates to direct measurements. The problem with surrogates is there are no standard protocols and sometimes no protocols at all. This training discussion session is to delve into alternative methodologies to estimate sediment reductions for BMP installations

    Webinar: May 26, 2010

    (Agenda | Presentations | Presenters)

    Short Course: Managing and Understanding Sediments in Your Watershed

    This workshop was created for professionals responsible for managing sediment in rivers and watersheds. Sediment is a leading source of pollution to our waterways, impacting water quality, aquatic habitat, recreational opportunities and aesthetic conditions. You will learn about where sediment comes from, the impact it has on aquatic resources, and methods and tools for assessing, monitoring, and managing sediment in your river system.

    Short Course: Oakland County, MI - October 20-21, 2008

    (Agenda | Presentations)

    Short Course: Buffalo, NY - December 8-9, 2009

    (Agenda | Presentations)

    Short Course: Milwaukee, WI - February 23-24, 2010

    (Agenda | Presentations)

    Short Course: Cleveland, OH - January 11-12, 2011

    (Agenda | Presentations)

    Short Course: Duluth, MN - July 24-25, 2012

    (Agenda | Contact Jim Selegean, USACE-Detroit, for more info)

     

    Interpreting the Sedimentary Record: Theory and Field Methods (5-day)

    This week-long, advanced course on sedimentation in the Great Lakes basin was created for professionals responsible for managing sediment in rivers and watersheds. Sediment is a leading source of pollution to our waterways, impacting water quality, aquatic habitat, recreational opportunities and aesthetic conditions. You will learn about the different types of sediment and how to identify and interpret them in the field, sediment dating and sampling methods, and the use of vegetation and other field tools to glean information about managing sediment in your river system.

    Advanced Course: Traverse City, MI - August 16-20, 2010

    (Agenda | Contact Jim Selegean, USACE-Detroit for more info)

    Advanced Course: Traverse City, MI - August 15-19, 2011

    (Agenda | Contact Jim Selegean, USACE-Detroit for more info)

    Advanced Course: Traverse City, MI - July 28 - August 1, 2014

    (Agenda | Presentations)

    Volunteer Sediment Monitoring Workshop (2-day)

    Sediment is a leading source of pollution to our waterways, impacting water quality, aquatic habitat, recreational opportunities and aesthetic conditions. This two-day workshop is suitable for professionals responsible for managing sediment in rivers and watersheds as well as for volunteer organizations who have an interest in monitoring sediment in their adopted streams. The workshop will include a mix of classroom and field sessions. You will learn about sediment and river features, how to monitor changes in a river channel over time through basic surveying and pebble counts, and how to map and document your observations for later analysis.

    Michigan: Roscommon, MI - August 2-3, 2012

    (Agenda | Presentations)

    Wisconsin: Green Bay, WI - September 25-26, 2013

    (Agenda | Contact Jim Selegean, USACE-Detroit for more info)

    New York: Rochester, NY - August 13-14, 2014

    (Agenda | Presentations)

     

    Ohio: Cleveland, OH - September 2014 (TBA) - Contact P. Shelby Fowler, USACE-Detroit, for more information

     

    Indiana: South Bend, IN - Fall 2014 (TBA) - Contact P. Shelby Fowler, USACE-Detroit, for more information

    *** Additional sessions of the webinar and short course are being planned for other areas in the Great Lakes Basin. Check back soon for more information!

     

    Related Projects:

    Nonpoint Source (NPS) Pollution Educational "Primers"

    The Corps continues to seek ways in which local partnerships can be improved and strengthened to promote sound soil and water conservation practices that result in improved water quality and other ecosystem benefits at the watershed level. In recent months, program staff have worked to develop a collection of interactive resources dedicated to this purpose.

    Access the NPS Educational Primer Modules and Other Resources

    NPS Educational Primer Fact Sheet

    The Potential Impacts of Increased Corn Production for Ethanol in the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Region (December 2007)

    Within the United States and Canada, a rising demand for alternative fuels has been spurred by high fossil fuel prices, political support and policy decisions, high corn prices, and technology improvements. Current trends have shown that the rapid expansion of biofuel production and the associated increased production of corn in the Midwest has had and will continue to have numerous and profound agricultural, environmental, and economic impacts. Understanding the potential impacts of biomass for biofuels production will help in the development of appropriate policy tools, as well as technology and management regimes to promote its positive impacts and mitigate its potential negative impacts.

    Executive Summary (94 kb)

    Full Report (1.3 mb)

    Project Poster (9.7 mb)

    The Economics of Soil Erosion and Sedimentation in the Great Lakes Basin

    The purpose of this report is to present the current state of knowledge on the economics of soil erosion and erosion control for the Great Lakes basin. Toward this end, this report describes what is known about the status of erosion and sedimentation in the basin; impacts from erosion and sedimentation on environmental resources, beneficial uses, and market goods; monetary damages from erosion and sedimentation and the benefits of erosion control; and the cost-effectiveness of erosion control programs and practices.

    Executive Summary (17 kb)

    Full Report (0.8 mb)

    Michigan Reference Curves Study

    Project Fact Sheet (0.2 mb)

     



     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Great Lakes Commission des Grands Lacs.  2805 S. Industrial Highway, Suite 100.  Ann Arbor, MI  48104-6791.  phone: 734/971.9135.  fax: 734/971-9150.  projects.glc.org. USACE, Detroit District GLIN Partner