Lake St. Clair Coastal Habitat

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Stressors
Stressors are those activities or phenomena that place stress on an organism or its natural habitat (community), threatening its viability. Most of the stressors described below are connected to human activities, but some are due to natural causes. Some human activities can increase the likelihood of natural stressors, such as allowing dead vegetation to build up, which can increase the likelihood of wildfire. Another example is the increase loadings of greenhouse gases, which has been attributed to global climate change and the attendant changes in the frequency and intensity of storms, melting of glaciers and changes in heating and cooling days, as well as changes in rates of precipitation and evaporation. Although natural disturbances are an integral part of healthy ecosystem dynamics, exacerbation of the frequency or intensity of those disturbances can threaten ecosystem integrity as much as human stressors.

Altered Hydrology
Water Level Changes Draining
Filling and Dredging Diking and Breakwalls

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Land Development / Urban Expansion
Urban Development Stormwater Habitat Fragmentation
Agriculture Soil Erosion and Sedimentation  

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Contaminants
Nutrient Loadings Toxic/Chemical Loadings Contaminated Sediments

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Shoreline Modification, Shipping and Boating
Vegetation Removal Shoreline Hardening
Marina Development Vessel Activity

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Invasive Species
Aquatic and Wetland Invasive Plants Aquatic and Wetland Invasive Animals
Terrestrial Invasive Plants Terrestrial Invasive Animals

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Natural Disturbances
Ice Storms Wildfire Flooding
Wind Throw Water Level Fluctuations  

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